Copper

what it does:

bone formation, hair and skin colour, healing processes of body, haemoglobin and red blood cell formation, production of RNA

bodily parts affected:

blood, bones, circulatory system, hair, skin, brain function

deficiency symptoms:

general weakness, anaemia, nerve problems, immune deficiency, skin sores, loss of hair, skeletal defects, reproductive problems, demyelination, cardiovascular conditions

antagonists:

zinc, vitamin C, calcium (high intakes), mercury, lead

food sources:

molasses, peas, beans, pulses, green vegetables, nuts (particularly brazil nuts), organ meats, seafood, dried fruit, pulses

Note:

The contraceptive pill and pregnancy increase copper levels, and can produce zinc deficiency, causing depression

Note 2:

Excessive copper, particularly combined with zinc and/or manganese deficiency has been associated with mental illness such as schizophrenia

Health information is not a substitute for good diagnosis,
and a doctor should be consulted when illness is present